Category Archives: Uncategorized

Tennis Pro Nicole Gibbs Oral Cancer Diagnosis

Just this week it was announced that US Tennis Pro Nicole Gibbs was diagnosed with Oral Cancer in a salivary gland. Nicole admitted that this grow had been on the roof of her mouth for many years and she didn’t think anything of it until her Dentist ordered a biopsy and it came back malignant. Oral Cancer is one of those cancers that is not discussed very often but the statistics of those being diagnosed each year continues to rise. Our team checks at each visit for anything suspicious and yearly we conduct a more in-depth Oral Cancer screening with our Velscope machine. The Velscope emits a light that can show anything suspicious under the skin. If we see anything the next step would be to biopsy the area. In our practice we have diagnosed oral cancer. This yearly check is painless and can be so helpful in early detection. This is so important to us! If you ever have any questions about a lump, bump or sore give us a call and we would be happy to schedule you for this Oral Cancer Screening!

Help us help some furbabies!

During the month of April we will be collecting items for Homeward Trails Animal Rescue. This great local rescue finds homes for dogs and cats rescued from low-income, rural animal shelters or whose owners can no longer care for them. We will be collecting the following items at our office- please feel free to drop by any donation during our business hours.

Dog Leashes Bath & Beach Towels Cat Litter

Martingale Style Collars High Quality Dog & Cat Food

Laundry and Dish Soap Paper Towels

White Copy Paper #10 Envelopes Postage Stamps

Gas Station Gift Cards Target & WalMart Gift Cards

Fluoride-Free Toothpaste Does Not Prevent Cavities, Study Finds.

 

The AP (8/7, Donn) reported that although the ability of fluoride to help prevent cavities “has been widely accepted for decades,” the “internet is dotted with claims” that “fluoride-free toothpaste also prevents cavities.” However, a recent review published in the journal Gerodontology found that oral hygiene efforts without fluoride do not reduce cavity rates. ADA spokesperson Dr. Matthew Messina said, “The study is important,” adding, “The study is supporting what we’ve been contending for a long time.” The article notes that “the ADA recommends using fluoride toothpastes.” Combining fluoride dental products with fluoridated water offers additional protection, added a professor at New York University.

We suggest Fluoridex toothpaste with a higher concentration of fluoride as well as sensitivity relief.  We would be happy to discuss the benefits of this toothpaste with you at your next visit!

Yes, you need to floss!

Flossing helps to remove food particles and bacteria from between your teeth and along your gumline. When this bacteria builds up, it forms plaque, a sticky, colorless film that can threaten your oral health by contributing to tooth decay and ginigivitis. Gingivitis is the first stage of gum disease, which can then evolve into periodontitis, the full-blown form of this health condition. “Gingivitis is the inflammation of the gums around your teeth, which will progress to periodontitis, which is inflammation of the gums in combination with bone loss. When left untreated, periodontitis can lead to tooth loss.

 Bleeding gums, a high rate of cavities, bone loss, and bad breath” are prevalent in people who don’t make flossing a habit.

Here are tips for flossing more effectively:

    • When using traditional floss instead of another type of interdental cleaner, use a long piece around 18 inches so there’s enough clean floss to get in between all your teeth.
    • Tie the floss around your middle finger on both hands and pinch it with your thumbs.
    • Keep the distance between your two hands small and go between each tooth in your mouth. Do this gently to avoid harming your gums.
    • To clean both teeth, make a C shape, hugging one tooth and sliding up and down, then make a C shape around the adjacent tooth and repeat the motion. Don’t forget the back sides of your last teeth!
  • Consider using a mouthwash, such as Therasol, after flossing to rinse your mouth and remove as much bad bacteria as possible.

The bottom line: When combined with brushing your teeth, flossing every day is a great way to keep your mouth healthy.

I need a crown and I don’t mean the rhinestone type!


crown

So you have been told you need a crown and you are not even sure what that means- here is a brief description of a crown.

“A crown, sometimes known as dental cap, is a type of dental restoration which completely caps or encircles a tooth or dental implant. Crowns are often needed when a large cavity threatens the ongoing health of a tooth. They are typically bonded to the tooth using a dental cement. Crowns can be made from many materials, which are usually fabricated using indirect methods. Crowns are often used to improve the strength or appearance of teeth. ”

Crowns are nothing to be scared of, we make the procedure painless with proper numbing techniques and walking you through each step.  If you have been told you need a crown call us today for your consultation.

crwon gold

Bad Breath and Valentines Day

Does bad breath worry you, have you noticed a persitant bad taste in your mouth or bad breath? This could be a warning sign of gum disease called periodontal disease. Gum disease can be caused by many things like the buildup of plaque on the teeth, poor brushing techniques, lack of flossing, just to name a few. Untreated gum disease can damage the gums and cause bone loss which can mean the loss of teeth.

Other dental causes of bad breath include poorly fitting dental appliances, yeast infections of the mouth, and dental caries (cavities).

The medical condition dry mouth (also called xerostomia) also can cause bad breath. Saliva is necessary to moisten the mouth, neutralize acids produced by plaque, and wash away dead cells that accumulate on the tongue, gums, and cheeks. If not removed, these cells decompose and can cause bad breath. Dry mouth may be a side effect of various medications or continuous breathing through the mouth.

If you have bad breath call us now to schedule an exam with Dr. Mullaney so we can help you have the best breath around for Valentines Day!

703-650-9320

E-Cigarettes and It’s Effects on Wound Healing

A new study  says patients should be banned from vaping for two months before surgery to avoid complications.  Author Dr Jeffrey Spiegel, chief of facial plastic surgery at Boston Medical Center, said: ‘Based on our findings, e-cigarettes are not a safe alternative to traditional cigarettes as it relates to timely wound healing,’ this new study shows vapes have the same effect on injured flaps of skin as does nicotine from traditional cigarettes. Providers, and patients, need to understand the risks of both types of smoking so they can make the best decision to keep the patient as safe as possible before and after surgery.’
In experiments on rats, Dr Spiegel and colleagues found vaping affected skin wound healing, causing damage similar to that of conventional smoking.
Both forms resulted in more of the tissue dying, which delays wound healing. They said the same would apply to humans.
It follows a warning by other American experts two years ago that nicotine in e-cigarette vapor increases the risk of blood flow-related complications – just like smoking real ones.
The study, published in JAMA Facial Plastic Surgery, is the first direct evidence that they were correct.
Dr. Spiegel said the adverse effects of traditional cigarette smoking on wound healing has been well established in the surgical field.  He added: ‘Smoking and vaping appear to be equally detrimental to wound healing and to be associated with a statistically significant increase in tissue death.  ‘The results suggest vaping should not be seen as a better alternative to cigarette smoking in the context of wound healing.
‘Surgeons are advised to appropriately counsel their patients and to regard those who use e-cigarettes as having equivalent pre-operative healing risk as those who smoke cigarettes.’
Shaun Desai, a plastic surgeon at Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, welcomed the findings and said patients should be screened for e-cig use before surgery.
He said: ‘This study presents evidence of the detrimental potency of e-cigarettes in rats, but there is a paucity of clinical evidence in humans.
‘Often, patients may not volunteer this information, mistakenly thinking vaping, because it is not smoking traditional cigarettes, is not relevant medical history that needs to be shared.
‘Similarly, until further studies are completed, all e-cigarette use should be stopped four weeks prior to any surgical procedure, as recommended by the current literature for traditional cigarettes.’

“Excerpts from the article recently published in Daily Mail UK”

Consuming Sugary Drinks May Increase Risk For Alzheimer’s Disease, Research Suggests


soda-tax-philadelphia-940x540

Newsweek (7/24, Gander) reports that new research suggests “drinking sugary soda could raise the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease.” The article reports that “scientists at Columbia University of New York studied rates of Alzheimer’s disease in older people and found a link between sugary drinks and the neurodegenerative condition,” although “more research is needed to prove whether Alzheimer’s is caused by these drinks.” The findings were presented at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference 2018.

Another drink wreaking havoc on teeth is sparkling water like LaCroix.  We are finding higher incidents of cavities in adults who sip these drinks all day.  We would love to discuss your daily soda/sparkling water habits to make sure you don’t get into any trouble- ask us at your next visit and lets discuss!

Diabetes, oral cancer and women

Diabetes-

A new study found that there is an  increased risk of cancer for women with diabetes vs men.

Previous research identified the link between diabetes and cancer risk, but this study looked at whether that risk differs between men and women.

The takeaway: Among people with diabetes, women have a 6 percent higher risk of cancer than men, the researchers said.

And based on the researchers’ analysis of data from 47 studies, diabetics of both sexes are at greater risk of cancer than people without diabetes.

For women with type 1 or type 2 diabetes, the cancer risk is 27 percent higher compared to other women. And men with diabetes have a 19 percent higher cancer risk than men who don’t have the blood sugar disease, the findings showed.

The researchers also examined specific types of cancer in people with diabetes and found that, compared to men, women have a 15 percent higher risk of leukemia, a 14 percent higher risk of stomach cancer, a 13 percent higher risk of oral cancer, and an 11 percent higher risk of kidney cancer.

But women have a 12 percent lower risk than men for liver cancer, according to the report.

“Further studies are needed to clarify the mechanisms underlying the sex differences in the diabetes-cancer association,” the study authors concluded.

The report, from Toshiaki Ohkuma of the University of New South Wales in Australia and colleagues at the University of Oxford in England, was published July 19 in the journal Diabetologia.

Cancer is the second leading cause of death worldwide, accounting for 8.7 million deaths in 2015. About one in four women and one in three men will develop cancer during their lifetime, the study authors noted in a journal news release.

(excerpts from Health Day July 20, 2018)